Reflecting on the work we’ve done this summer, both in creating A Sense of Place, as an event and the piece EveryBody Dances (and of course all of the works in the concert, and other work that I (Cindi) have been doing since I don’t know when) reminds me of the challenges and opportunities presented when we work together. A Sense of Place is a practice in community building. It is an event designed to bring the community together, to share in the creative capital available to all of us and to remind audiences that they are more than passive observers, but instead, they are the lifeblood of the work that artists do. EveryBody Dances is a completely collaborative work. Jessica Howard and myself have worked together to create a structure and theme for the piece, and to find ways to assist the community dancers in creating movement and learning to express themselves through dance. It is remarkable to watch the dancers (many of whom are “non” dancers) work together to create movement based on our cues and suggestions. The piece does not exist and could not exist without collaboration and improvisation.

In May, I created a work called Strings Attached (you can see info about that on this page and at http://www.dilettantedance.blogspot.com). The piece was an exploration of interactive performance, and in the process of creating the work, I reflected on the nature of improvisation, collaboration and the role of the audience vs. artist. In my research, I came back (and was directed by my mentor Cathy Nicoli) to the book Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art by Stephen Nachmanovitch, especially the chapter called “Playing Together”.  There are many insights in this work, but I wanted to share one that seemed especially apropos of A Sense of Place and EveryBody Dances (and hopefully when you attend the event on July 24th, this rings true for you):

The separate beings of audience and performers can disappear, and at such moments there is a kind of secret complicity between us. We catch glances in each other’s eyes and see ourselves as one. Our minds and hearts move together to the rolling of the rhythm. This is more likely to happen at informal performances where there is no stage and no fixed seating to impose a dualistic split between active performers and passive audience. Through subtle but powerful entrainments, the audience, the environment, and the players link into a self-organizing whole. Even the dogs int he room are entrained. We discover together and at the same time the rhythmic and emotional scene as it unfolds. The skin-boundaries become semipermeable, then irrelevant; performers, audience, instruments, the room, the night outside, space, become one being, pulsing.

Baltimore Performance of Strings Attached in August 2009

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Contact Jam!

June 28, 2010

Tuesday, July 27 please join Dilettante Dance in a Contact Improv Jam at the Heberton Hall on West Street, Keene NH.

This event is completely FREE and open to anyone—all levels of experience welcome.

4:30-5:00: Introductory Class led by Dilettante Dance

5:00-7:00 Open Contact Jam (enter and leave at will)

Sponsored by The Keene Public Library and Dilettante Dance

For more info please call Jessica Howard at 603-560-0973 or email dilettantedance@gmail.com

 

Image by: Edgar Jansen

On Monday, June 14th we began rehearsals for EveryBody Dances (there’s a tab for that, so I won’t bother with a link!).  Because this is a community process, I wanted to share it with the rest of the community, through this blog, and hopefully (subsequently) on Cheshire TV.

Our first rehearsal included 6 members of the Keene Community. Note: you can still join in the next rehearsal (Tuesday, June 22 at 4:30pm at the Heberton Hall on West St. Keene, next to the Keene Public Library), but after that the process will be closed to new dancers, so that we can be performance-ready by July 24th!

After a warm-up and introductions between dancers, we began by learning a phrase that I (Cindi) had choreographed earlier to fit with phrases made by Jess in a trio. The dancers (some “dancers” and some “non-dancers”) learned the phrase beautifully and had a lot of questions about performance details, which is pretty exciting, because it speaks to their engagement in the learning process.

After that, the rehearsal switched to a more creative process. EveryBody Dances explores ideas of space, place and home in  multi-dimensional way (for example: in exploring space, I can focus on abstract dance concepts (negative space, positive space, planes), the performance space (an outdoor amphitheater), or my favorite space to sit and read a book.). I gave the dancers several prompts to lead them to create their own phrases. Initially we visualized the building of a personal shelter and then the dancers (with cues from me) began to “move” that shelter, thinking about the task of building it, the negative and positive space and what they felt (physically) if they placed themselves inside of it. We used a free-writing (except it was free-dancing) process to create that movement (no editing, keep moving etc.) and then within that the dancers found sections of the movement that they remembered and repeated. These sections became the basis of a new phrase.

The second exercise I gave was to have each dancer think about his/her earliest memory and let that image or feeling sink in. They then took the movement they had found in the “shelter” improvisation and created a phrase (clear beginning, middle and end) that used the “shelter” movement, but was “about” the earliest memory. This kind of open-ended work is very difficult–clearly there are no wrong answers and many ways to interpret the assignment, and the dancers rose to the choreographic challenge, which was exciting.

The third exercise was one that focused on negative and positive space and shapes. It is a common exercise (one dancer makes a shape and the other fills in the negative space), however I manipulated it thematically. My instructions: “Make a shelter out of your partner and then inhabit that shelter.”

Finally, I divided the dancers into two trios and they created small trio dances during which each dancer performed his/her solo phrase while the other two worked with “shelter” structures. These two small “pieces” may later become part of the final work (highly likely, unless the dancers object!).

The goal of EveryBody Dances is to collaborate with the community, so the choreography and the performance should come from community members. Please click on the EveryBody Dances tab above to find more ways to participate, because we want your help in creating this work, even if you are not performing.

Strings Attached: An Experiment in Connection

May 19, 8pm at TSA Collective
$5 donation

“…interaction should consist of bidirectional communication, and can have no predetermined outcome if the interactors are genuinely engaged in the exchange of information/experience.” Sita Popat

Strings Attached is an interactive performance choreographed and performed by Cindi L’Abbe. The piece explores the roles of audience, director and performer through modes of audience participation, choreographed structure and improvisation. Soundscore will be provided by Ian Logan and David Ross. The performance will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Laina Barakat.
The panel includes Cindi L’Abbe, Ian Logan (of Sisters and Brothers) and Cathy Nicoli (dance faculty at Keene State College).

What’s the point?
To allow audience members to “enter” a dance by interacting and directing the performance
To explore the concept of communication through a dance conversation using words and physical strings
To illustrate the connected-ness of human beings through invisible and visible threads
To create interactive art as a demonstration of the creative potential of audiences as well as performance, to democratize the dance

What are we talking about?
Interactive elements in performance art as methods of creating audience “connection”, relevance
Improvisation as conversation, performance as communication
The performing arts as an illustration of humanity